Gwynn (Henry) Papers, 1862-1897, 5 Items

Administrative Information


Access: Unrestricted

Copyright: The copyright of these letters is held by Navarro College Archives, Navarro College, 3200 W. 7th Ave., Corsicana, Texas. Internet: archives@navarrocollege.edu.

Cite As:Henry Gwynn Family Papers, 1862-1897, Pearce Civil War Collection, Navarro College, Corsicana, Texas

Forms Part of: Pearce Civil War Collection

Location: 1-E1-b

Transcription(s): Yes

Scanned Copies on File: No

Accession Number: 2004.381

Processed by: Ned Humphrey, February 2004

Reproductions of original materials and transcriptions may be available. Please contact the archivist for further information.

Abstract: Five items document the family of Henry Gwynn of the 9th Virginia Infantry. One letter dated July 29, 1862 and signed by Henry Gwynn describes his experiences at the Battle of Malvern Hill. A “Daughters of the Confederacy” information sheet from the Baltimore Chapter, one copy of an article in the Baltimore Press on CSA veteran General Walter Gwynn, dated February 1882, and a poem written by V. F. Gwynn, dated December 4, 1897 are also included.

Biographical/Historical Sketch

Henry Gwynn was born on July 24, 1836 in Baltimore, Maryland. He was civil engineer. He became a Captain in the Virginia 9th Infantry, Co. F. He was stationed in the field at the time the letter was written. He served in Longstreet’s Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. In June of 1863 Co. F was a part of Armistead’s Brigade, Picket Division. They marched from Hanover Junction through Maryland into Pennsylvania and were engaged conspicuously in the Battle of Gettysburg where Henry was taken prisoner.

Scope and Content Note

The addressee of the letter is unknown. It was written in the field, July 29, 1862. He describes his duties as searching for arms and ammunition as well as burying the dead. It contains a description of the aftermath of the Battle of Malvern Hill. Gwynn decries the horrors and wastes of war. He strongly believes the Confederacy should carry the war into Union territory. He speaks of a trip to Richmond, seeing mutual friends, and local news. The poem written by V. F. Gwynn in 1897 is an ode to a fallen friend.


The copyright of these materials is managed by the Navarro College Archives on behalf of the Navarro College Foundation, 3100 W. Collin St., Corsicana, Texas 75110. Phone: 903-875-7438. Internet: archives@navarrocollege.edu.