A Lifetime of Correspondence
Page One
1859-1864
(Copyright held by the Pearce Civil War Collection, Navarro College Archives.
To request permission to use the following letter in electronic or print format, please contact the archivist.)

April 10, 1859
L.D. Bradley to Miss Minnie Grayson
Galveston

In this letter, Bradley asks Minnie Grayson to marry him. He hopes that she will answer yes, because his life and happiness depend on receiving an answer in the affirmative.
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December 19, 1862
L.D. Bradley to Father
Granada

Bradley writes to his father a very informative letter concerning his company's movements and the action (or lack thereof) seen so far. He mentions Abbeville, Cold Water, Holly Springs, the Tallahatchee River, the Central Mississippi River Road, General Tilgham, and General Baldwin. He mentions being close to the fight at the skirmish at Coffeyville, but it seems that most of his company's casualties come from disease. He names those lost to disease or unheard of so that his father may pass the news along to their relatives if anyone should ask. He does not seemed overly distressed by the number of disease-related casualties because he has a very large company.

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March 22, 1863
De to Little Honey
Fort Pemberton

Bradley mostly writes about home matters and his longing to be at home with his wife and daughter in this letter, but he does mention several soldiers being ill and his fears that the war will not be over as quickly as he had hoped. They have successfully defended their position from small Yankee attacks, but it seems the main Federal force is below them on the river, so he expects to move soon. He has tasted his first battle and did not enjoy it. He asks his wife for summer clothes, but he does not think he will need more winter clothes, so he either believes the war will be over by the time the weather grows colder again, or that he will have a chance to visit home, which would mean he was no longer needed in the Vicksburg area.
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July 27, 1864
De to Little Darling
Mud Island

Bradley writes to his wife that he has moved to a new outpost on a small island that is two miles wide and three miles long, separated from Galveston by San Luis Pass. Mud Island, as it is called, is desolate with no trees, no tall bushes, constant, hard wind, and the constant din of seagulls. They are there to protect the coast and to aid blockade-runners that make it that far through the Union ships. One such ship is almost in range of their guns, and he has ordered the men to fire on it should it come any closer. He continues his letter with copious expressions of his love for Minnie and asks her to write more frequently.
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September 17, 1864
De to Little Honey
Mud Island

Bradley writes to Minnie upon receipt of a letter two letters from a relative informing him that she has given birth to their second daughter. He can hardly contain his happiness at the news and asks many questions about her health. He is distressed to hear that Minnie was quite ill and in great danger, but is confident she will recover shortly.
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