A Lifetime of Correspondence
Page Two
1865-1875
(Copyright held by the Pearce Civil War Collection, Navarro College Archives.
To request permission to use the following letter in electronic or print format, please contact the archivist.)

March 6, 1865
De to Little Honey
Galveston

Bradley writes to his wife shortly after being arrested in Galveston. Apparently some soldiers were upset that all leaves had been cancelled, so they marched on headquarters and then to General Hawes home in order to receive leave or kill him. They were repelled by guards and dispersed, but a crowd of soldiers and civilians had gathered near the Methodist Church. The units sent to disperse the crowd were ordered to fire into the crowd. Bradley, who was there to make sure none of his company was involved in the attack on Gen. Hawes, writes that most of the soldiers fired into the air, but some did not. One soldier from his regiment was killed, several other wounded. As it was Sunday night, the Methodist Church was just adjourning and there were many ladies present. Bradley denounced the officer who gave the order to fire, and instead of arresting that officer, Gen. Hawes arrested Bradley for speaking his mind. Bradley seems almost thrilled to be in this position because he gets to defend himself and speak for what he believes to be right.
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April 13, 1865
Minnie to De
Location unknown

Minnie writes to Bradley on his 34th birthday about the situation at home. Their daughter, Annie, is ill with a fever, and Minnie is very worried about her. Minnie is not feeling well, and Callie has a cold. Minnie misses him terribly and wishes he were there with her. She adds, at the top of the letter, an addendum from the next day telling him that Annie is still quite ill.
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April 29 & 30, 1865
De to Little Honey
Galveston

Bradley's letter to Minnie is very informative as to his opinions of the events taking place in the war. He sees Lincoln's assassination as offsetting Lee's surrender. He blames Lincoln and other United States officials as holding the blame for the war and tremendous bloodshed, so that although he claims to be opposed to assassination, he believes it is the right thing to do in this situation. Bradley still vehemently believes that the Confederacy will prevail in the war, despite the surrender of the commanding general and his army. Bradley repeats rumors, and although he claims not to believe them, he is very hopeful that Sherman was defeated and Johnson assassinated as some claim. He also believes Seward died; in fact, he was only wounded.
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August 19, 1866
De to Little Honey
Austin

Bradley writes that he is glad he ran for the Legislature because he feels that he can influence the future course of government, although he regrets being away from home. He writes that he is comfortably boarding at a hotel with Judge Yarboro and Tyree and that they went to a ball, he describes the ladies for his wife and writes of one who was particularly scandalously clad. He also mentions the threat of cholera in the city and the sickness of some members from "congestion of the bowels".
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January 23, 1875
Papa to Papa's Boy
Austin

Bradley writes to his son and tells him about the toolbox he will give him when he gets home and tells him how much food he would need if he were to come to Austin.
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L.D. Bradley
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